Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Santa Barbara Museum of Modern Art Presents this Thursday


Scenes from Antigone

admission FREE

Thursday November 19th
5:30 pm


 Santa Barbara Museum of Contemporary Art 
top floor at Paseo Nuevo


www.mcasantabarbara.org/
  • Address: 653 Paseo Nuevo, Upper Arts Terrace, Santa Barbara, CA 93101
    Phone:(805) 966-5373



  • SCENES FROM ANTIGONE directed by Matthew Tavianini and 
    with Kate Bergstrom as Antigone, Josh Jenkins as Haemon, 
    Jennifer Marco as Ismene, and Ed Giron as Creon. Please come! 
     
    Performing pursuant to a grant obtained by Celeste Barber at SBCC. 
    This show has been performed mostly at SBCC but also other venues 
    and not only is this a fantastic location but .... this is the closing performance.



    Synopsis

    Antigone tells the story of the title character, daughter of Oedipus (the former king of Thebes, who unknowingly killed his father and married his mother, and who renounced his kingdom upon discovering his actions), and her fight to bury her brother Polyneices against the edict of her uncle, Creon, the new king of Thebes. It is a story that pits the law of the gods—"unwritten law"—against the laws of humankind, family ties against civic duty, and man against woman.
    Many playwrights in Ancient Greece used mythological stories to comment on social and political concerns of their time. This is what Sophocles may have intended when he wrote Antigone. Based on the legends of Oedipus, Sophocles may have been trying to send a message to the Athenian general, Pericles, about the dangers of authoritarian rule.
    These tragedies were written to be performed at the Great Dionysia (a festival in honor of the god Dionysus, the god of fertility, theater, and wine) in Athens. Attending these plays was considered a civic duty, and even criminals were let out of jail to attend. Antigone won Sophocles first prize at the festival and was an enormous success. It is still performed today, and has been adapted by French playwright Jean Anouilh, who set the play during World War II.


    See you there!
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